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Today Split

Split is a town whose citizens with their specific temperament move “in slow motion”, i.e. the rhythm of life is much slower than the western one. Apart from the friendly and (almost always) open and good humoured citizens you will also often stumble upon sounds of traditional Dalmatian songs – “klapa” (a capella) singing, in the town’s stone alleys in summer period.

Apart from the water activities Split offers rich sports program all year round because Split is the town of recreation and, as we like to say, “The sportiest town in the world”. Split has also grown into a big science centre since its University keeps growing in quality and capacity. 

Traffic and tourism are also very important segments of regional economy. The city harbour is the largest and the most important passengers’ port in the Adriatic. It is the best preserved historical port of the Mediterranean.

Its colouristic ambient, once painted with sails of wooden galleys anchored under the walls of the imperial palace has enchanted many passengers and different artists. This harbour’s ambient is being brought into the town through the old city fish market where fishermen sell their fresh catch, as well as the near market where fresh fruit and vegetables, ecologically cultivated in suburb’s fields and gardens, are being sold. 

Concerning the air traffic, the airport is only 20 km away from the town, and rail and bus stations are in the vicinity of the town centre and in the centre of the city harbour. The road traffic has been considerably improved since the long planned highway was built making the Split region directly connected with continental Croatia and Zagreb. 

The city traffic is limited on cars and buses because trams and other faster vehicles don’t exist, but because of the close connection and configuration of the city area there is no need for them.

Accommodation capacity was greatly reduced during the war years, but nowadays a significant growth is visible.

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